Tuesday, 24 May 2022 00:00

Many people complain about pain in the heel of their foot at some point in their lives. Plantar fasciitis, or inflammation of the plantar fascia, is one of the most common causes of this. The plantar fascia is the broad band of connective tissue running along the bottom of the foot that joins the heel bone to the toes, provides support for the arch of the foot, acts as a shock absorber, and bears the body’s weight. Plantar fasciitis develops when this band of tissue becomes irritated, torn, or inflamed. This condition can be extremely painful, especially with the day’s first steps. The pain at the bottom of the heel, and sometimes the midfoot area, can be sharp and stabbing or dull and achy. Once a person starts walking, the pain usually reduces but it may come on again after prolonged periods on one’s feet or when standing after sitting for a while. While causes of plantar fasciitis are not clear, research shows that heel spurs can result from plantar fasciitis, which can cause pain. This ailment is common among athletes, those who are on their feet a lot, and those who are obese. If you are suffering with heel pain, it is suggested you see a podiatrist who can make a proper diagnosis and lead you in treatment.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Eddy Caldwell from Foot Care of Northeast Arkansas, P.A.. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Jonesboro, AR . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Thursday, 19 May 2022 00:00

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

As summer nears, many of us want to go barefoot or wear flip-flops rather than closed-toed shoes and socks. Flip-flops are easy to grab and wear, can feel cool, and help with healing foot problems requiring less restriction of the feet. Their breathability can also help prevent foot infections. However, there are downsides to wearing flip-flops which generally involve their lack of padding and support. Flip-flops can be worn occasionally with no problem, but they do not absorb shock, can be dangerous in certain terrains, cause blisters from the Y strap rubbing against the skin, and negatively affect the biomechanics of the body because the stride is toe to heel versus the opposite usual stride. Wearing flip-flops can lead to pain in the back, hips, legs, and lower joints and cause other foot conditions like flat feet and plantar fasciitis. The obvious solution is to use care in wearing flip-flops and pay attention to what your feet may be telling you.  If you have over-worn your flip-flops and are having problems with your feet as a result, consult with a podiatrist to check for problems and obtain a treatment regimen.

Flip-flops are not always the best choice of footwear. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Eddy Caldwell from Foot Care of Northeast Arkansas, P.A.. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

Flip-Flops and Feet

When the weather starts warming up, people enjoy wearing flip-flops.  Flip-flops are comfortable, stylish, and easy to slip on and off; they're perfect for any summer beach goer.  However, these shoes can cause harm to the feet.

How Can Flip-Flops Affect Me Long-Term?

  • Ankle problems
  • Hip problems
  • Lower back problems
  • Pain in the balls of the feet
  • Problems with foot arches
  • Changes in the way you walk

Are There Injuries Associated with Flip-Flops?

Yes.  Since flip-flops are relatively weak and do not provide the same amount of support as sneakers, people who wear flip-flops regularly are more susceptible to injuries. On top of that, the open nature of the shoe makes your feet more prone to other problems, such as cuts and even infections.  Common injuries and ailments include:

  • Sprained ankles
  • Blisters
  • Infections
  • Cuts and Scrapes

I like Wearing Flip-Flops. Are There Safe Alternatives?

When buying flip-flops, try to find ones that have sturdy soles and that are made of high-quality materials that will support for your feet.  These flip-flops will cost more but will also last longer as a result.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Jonesboro, AR .  We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

When children experience a growth spurt during puberty there can be an imbalance in the growth rate of their muscles, bones, and tendons. This is termed Sever’s disease, which generally affects children between the ages of 8 and 14. This condition occurs because the muscles and tendons in the heel become tight, pulling on the growth plate (cartilage) in the back of the heel. It is quite common in children who are particularly active in sports with a lot of running and jumping or other strenuous activities, such as gymnastics and dancing. Your child may experience redness or swelling in the back of the heel, stiffness in the feet first thing in the morning, and pain when the heel is squeezed on both sides. You also may notice them limping or walking on their tiptoes. Cutting down on the activities which induce the pain is one way to help alleviate symptoms of Sever’s disease, which may last for a few months. To be on the safe side, however, it is a good idea to introduce your child to a podiatrist who can conduct a full examination and suggest a program of treatment. 

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Eddy Caldwell from Foot Care of Northeast Arkansas, P.A.. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Jonesboro, AR . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease

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